splash

Music Marketing

Posted By Rick Goetz on July 6th, 2013

A blog for musicians and music industry people. It is a free educational resource and it is also the way I advertise my music consulting services. I am an entertainment professional with deep roots in the music industry. Throughout my music career I have been a major label A&R representative, a music supervisor, an artist manager, a reality show producer, a bass player and the head of a digital record label.

 

Get a Music Manager, Part 1

Posted By Rick Goetz on April 18th, 2013   
Share Button

This is a re-post of an article I originally wrote in June, 2010. Even almost three years later, it still represents the mindset of a lot of musicians looking to succeed in the music business.

 

“How do I find a music manager?” “How do I find a booking agent?” “I just need to find someone to get my music to the next level.” I’ve heard these questions and statements before. And fifteen or so years ago, I sounded exactly like this. As it turns out, I wound up on the industry side of the fence and traded in the crowded smelly van for a record company desk job, but I do have some answers for you. If you showed up here via Google search chances are you won’t like what I am going to tell you, but I implore you to keep reading.

Let’s start at the very beginning:  Do you have anything to manage?

 

I know – sounds like a stupid question … but is it? I’m not asking you if you have lots of work that you could use help with, nor am I making light of the pure volume of work that is the creation of both recorded and live music. What I am asking you is, do you have something ready to bring to market that needs managing … or are you still building out your product?

 

There is no shame (I’ll repeat it again, NO SHAME) in being in the developmental phases of your career. We live in an instant-gratification kind of world, which is why when I write articles like this I know statistically that a majority of people won’t have made it this far because they were looking for a “get famous now” button. Take your time and develop your product; this will help you rise above the MILLIONS of other people who went out to guitar center purchased their first instrument and recording gear and had the first song they ever wrote up on MySpace the next day, hoping for some kind of miracle that won’t ever come.

 

Back to management:  Let’s talk about what you should have together before even considering approaching someone to invest in your career.  *** Notice I said, “invest,” because, whether or not they spend a dime on you, management is an enormous expenditure of someone’s time.***

 

Before approaching anyone to manage you, you need to have most of these items together:

 

  1. No apology recordings of your music
  2. Professional looking photos of you or your group
  3. A basic, findable website (custom URL) you can update yourself
  4. A Mailing list and a place where people can sign up on said list
  5. A social network presence (Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, YouTube)
  6. Live performance footage (preferably in front of a crowd)
  7. A well-written bio highlighting your accomplishments

 

These are the building blocks and the marketing materials you will use over and over and over again. There are no words, no email sales pitch and probably not even naked photos of an executive in compromising positions that will get you taken more seriously than having the items above in place. Many of these items can get pricey, so do your homework and shop around if you feel that any of these items are best done by work for hire. Having these materials will get your more gigs, get you taken more seriously by your peers and potential fans and ultimately (if you have a product people want) will help you build a business in music.

 

“Okay – wait – isn’t this super basic?  Does he think we are idiots?”

 

No, absolutely not. But I can tell you that statistically aspiring musicians are looking at the wrong things to get ahead.  Check out what people search for online for music related terms according to a Google AdWords query in April 2013.

 

Term: “Get My Music Heard Online”

Global Monthly Searches:  58

 

Term: “Get more people to my shows”

Global Monthly Searches:  28

 

Term: “Make a Living In Music”

Global Monthly Searches:  800

 

Term: “Marketing My Music”

Global Monthly Searches:  140

 

Term: “Get a Music Manager”

Global Monthly Searches:  1,900

 

Term:  “How to Get A Record Deal”

Global Monthly Searches:  9,900

 

Draw your own conclusions, but I think too many people are looking for a shortcut to fame that — barring an act of God or Justin Bieber — just doesn’t exist.

 

I will be back with the subsequent portion(s) of this increasingly poorly-named article early next week and I will actually get up to the part where you approach someone, and what you should discuss.

 

In the meantime, do a search under “manager”  in the search bar at the top right of the blog to find lots of fun interviews with very experienced music managers.

 

…Or continue to part 2 now.

Share Button

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

 

GET MUSIC BUSINESS HELP NOW!

 

Similar Posts
Posted in Music Business

11 Responses to “Get a Music Manager, Part 1”

Patrick

I have to say I found this article refreshing and uplifting. I agree, for the majority of people developing songwriting skills and a musical persona is a long term process. What else could it be? This is much better than similarly titled articles I’ve read that are hysterically depressing. Keep up the good work. I’m looking forward to the next installment.

Sarah Dennis

Hi there,
This is a really interesting article. Can’t wait for the next part. I am a professional singer based in Manchester,United Kingdom. I am also very interested in helping new acts, get their act together. The craze in the music business associated with America’s got talent / Britain’s Got Talent and the X factor has, I think made youngsters think that this is the only way into the business. For your information I have put together a FREE online course for anyone wishing to get started and I would really appreciate your opinion on it. To receive the
7 Inspirational Steps to Getting Your Act Together simply enter your email address in the boxes on my blog at http://topvocalcoach.com. If you want to check out my promotional website for my act, it is at http://www.darlingofshowbiz.com

I am very interested in what your work.
Best Regards
Sarah Dennis

Z

It’s amazing how your site answers everyone of my questions! After a year of reading almost every article, I’ve learned so much about the business side of music and I think it’s fair to say that because of you I have and will avoid a lot of mistakes in the future.

Best Begards from Paris, France.

Z

JSF

Sorry but your comment of I quote (shortcut to fame that barring an act of God or Justin Bieber just doesn’t exist).

Well sorry to burst your bubble, but Justin Bieber did it, niothing is impossible, so the comment of doesnt exist, is way off, he is living proof it does,, keep working , keep changing your approach, but, you never know who can knock on your door. So I definitly agree with your comment. Act of God happens every day my friend, faith, belief, has a great deal to do with it. Oh yes hard work, of course… But bieber is working much harder now, then his little video on the street , that made him famous… never count yourself out !>>>

Musician Coaching

So you agree with my comment, but you don’t agree with my comment? The point is sitting on your ass waiting for fame isn’t going to work.

Jenny

Hi, I have found this article priceless, really got, on the money no nonsense advice. However (and please forgive me) but what on earth is a ‘No apology recordings of your music’? I have searched the web and come up with nothing, please elaborate upon this… Thank you :)

66notes

Very informative Musician Coaching….made me reevaluate rushing into certain aspects of the music business that may have set my music back in the long run. Thanks

DEAN H ANDERSON

Rick

Part one is refreshingly realistic. Thanks for not sugar-coating the way things are. I feel a little bit sorry for people like “JSF”, who in the end quibble over the semantics of a point they’ve completely missed.

I think it would be valuable to exhibit a short bio, so readers might have a better idea of the experience you wield…

Thanks for the advice in any event, on to part 2…

Trackbacks

  1. Get A Music Manager 2 | Musician Coaching
  2. Get A Music Manager 3 | Musician Coaching
  3. FInd a Music Manager 7 | Musician Coaching

Leave a Reply